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Fibroid Removal After Miscarriage

Dilation and Curettage D C Surgery PreOp Patient Engagement and Education

Http:youtu.beJiaqOtVna1g Your has recommended that you undergo a Dilation and Curettage, or D and C. But what does that actually mean? The uterus is part of a woman’s reproductive system. It’s the organ that contains the growing fetus. The cervix forms the neck of the uterus, and the vagina is the canal through which conception and birth take place. The endometrium is a soft lining that protects the fetus during pregnancy.

Reasons for having a D and C vary. Most D and C’s are performed because the patient has complained of unusually heavy menstrual bleeding. Other common problems include, uterine infection, bleeding after sexual intercourse, incomplete miscarriage or the presence of polyps small pieces of extra tissue growing on the inside of the uterine wall. Then the surgeon will use a gloved hand to conduct a vaginal examination and will check the size and location of the uterus by pressing on your lower abdomen.

A metal or plastic vaginal speculum is used to gently expand the vagina and allow access to the cervix. Once the cervix is visible, a forcep is used to grasp the front lip of the cervix causing the uterus to open a little. Using a blunttipped probe, the surgeon carefully measures the length of the uterus and takes a small sample of tissue from the cervical canal. Next, the surgeon will dilate, or open the cervix, using a series of progressively larger metal rods called dilators.

When the cervix has expanded sufficiently, the will use a spoonshaped instrument called a curette to gently scrape out the lining of the uterus. In some cases, surge When the entire lining of the uterus has been removed, the instruments are withdrawn. The tissue removed will then be sent to a laboratory for analysis.

Myoma Uterine Fibroids What is Myoma Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Myoma

A fibroid is a benign tumor that mainly consists have muscular tissue and usually grows inside the uterus. Fibroids are also called myomas. Its size ranges widely, from a small tumor the size of a pea to a large tumor almost the size of the uterus. Myomas are classified into three types, depending on the location where they are found. The intramural myoma, a fibroid that grows.

In the muscular wall of the uterus. This subserosal myoma, a fibroid located just beneath the outside mucosal covering of the uterus. Here the fibroid projects to the outside and occasionally remains connected with the uterus only through a small stalk. The submucosal myoma, a tumor that grows beneath the surface of the uterus lining. Therefore, this type of fibroids can grow into the uterine cavity. The actual causes have development of a fibroid are still unclear.

However, it has been documented that fibroids are associated with high levels of estrogen, the female sex hormone. Fibroids can only developed during reproductive years of women. Following menopause, the production of estrogen decreases which will usually cause fibroids to shrink or disappear. Myomas are more common in nonpregnant and infertile women. In general, fibroids are asymptomatic.

Or associated with just a few complaints if any complaints. If any complaints occur, then the location, size and type of the fibroid are the major factors. Fibroids can affect nearby structures. They can cause compression of the bladder, which may lead to urinary complaints, or may obstruct the intestine, which may result in constipation. Other complaints can be: backaches, abdominal problems, menstrual flow disturbances.

Fibroids can impede normal childbirth, which may require caesarean delivery. Fibroids relatively more often lead to miscarriages. Whenever fibroids cause symptoms, they need to be removed or shrinked. Medications sometimes cause fibroid to shrink by blocking the production and secretion of estrogen. In other cases, surgery may be required to remove the fibroid.

The type of surgery depends on the location of the fibroid. Sometimes it’s possible to remove the fibroid with the help of the tube entered through the vagina and the procedure is called hysteroscopic myomectomy. In other cases, surgery through the abdominal wall may be necessary. In the case of a large fibroid, hysterectomy may be the only solution. This option only applies when there is no desire to have more children. You general practitioner can give you more.

Information about the disorder and it’s possible treatments.

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