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Fibroid Removal Nhs

Hi i’m jo carter, i was a little bit shocked to begin with because i don’t think it was anything serious I just had a little pain in my stomach and I went to the s thinking that it was probably just a little hernia or something and after a few scans they told me it was quite a big growth from that point I was shocked and also it was pretty daunting to think that I was going to have an operation as I always thought I was quite fit and healthy. The tumour was not too far off the size of this rugby ball I think.

It was 25 cm by 20cm by 17cm which is quite shocking considering the size of me and the fact I didn’t know I had it. We actually called it Filbert, hoping it was a fibroid which it was, so we called it Filbert the fibroid and we were counting down the days to removal really. The surgeon was great pretty much from the moment I got diagnosed to the actual surgery itself it was faultless, it was really quick and I couldn’t have really asked for any more, from the scans they were probably a week.

Two weeks apart i saw the consultant twice and before i knew it i was in for the op, so really really good I was exercising fairly early on from as soon as I could move, I just started walking around the block, it got a bit longer and then I went back to the pool and just walked up and down in the pool and did quite a lot of aqua aerobics and then as soon as I could I got on my bike probably from about 8 or 9 weeks but with no resistance, it wasn’t far on from then I did a sportif of about 40 miles, I think it was the November. Probably the first one that I won.

Which was mud sweat and beers and that was in the march say fairly soon afterwards and then i’ve gone on to win quite a few more. I did the iron run in August which was actually the day before it was my op anniversary that was August 22 this year and I won that so that was quite a highlight it was quite significant in the fact that it was almost a year to that date and then Man V Mountain was the following weekend so completing that was great and I think I came about 13th in the females and in the first quarter of everyone so I was quite pleased with that.

Finding out about Fibroids information for patients

Hello, i’m lisa le roux. i’m a gp. Along with my colleagues we have made this film about fibroids. You may have found it as you have heavy periods or other symptoms associated with fibroids. Please see your GP to discuss this and see what treatment options may be available as a starting point. This film gives you an overview about what fibroids are, what treatment options are available and how we can support you.

You may have questions afterwards which you can talk to your gp or consultant about. We also have a patient information leaflet on fibroids. I’m Debbie Holloway, I’m a nurse consultant in gynaecology at Guy’s and St Thomas’. This means I specialise in the female reproductive system. I’m going to talk today about fibroids and what symptoms you may have. Fibroids are generally noncancerous growths that develop in the womb.

They’re made up of fibrous tissue which is an overgrowth of the muscle of the womb. Approximately between two and four women in every 10 will get fibroids at some point in their life The exact cause of fibroids is still unknown we know that the fibroids are linked to oestrogen which is a female hormone from the menstrual cycle produced by the ovaries. We know that some women, if they’re overweight produce more oestrogen and may be more prone to fibroids and the other.

Group of women that are more prone to fibroids are women who are afrocarribean and again we don’t know why this might be. Often women have small fibroids that don’t cause any symptoms at all and don’t need any treatment. Otherwise fibroids do shrink after the menopause when there’s no oestrogen around and symptoms will get better then. In some women, they have severe symptoms that can cause an impact on the quality of life, and do need treatment such as tablets or operations.

Fibroids can cause a whole range of symptoms and not all women get all of these symptoms but they can cause heavy painful and prolonged periods, anaemia which results from loss of red blood cells caused by heavy periods which can make you feel very tired and weak bleeding in between the periods or bleeding during or after sex. Pain or discomfort around sex, a bloated tummy which can cause you to look pregnant, tummy or.

Lower back pain, a constant urge to pass urine and constipation. In some cases fibroids can cause you to have problems getting pregnant. If you are suffering from symptoms you’ll probably have visited your GP to discuss the problems you’re having. Symptoms may be a sign of other conditions so your GP will need to find out a little bit more about what you’re experiencing. Fibroids can grow anywhere in or on the outside wall of the womb and vary in size considerably from.

The size of a pea up to the size of a melon. most women coming in for treatment will have more than one fibroid and have differing sizes. Of the three types of fibroids the most common are intramural fibroids which develop within the wall of the womb. The second most common are submucosal fibroids which means they develop inside the lining of the womb. These can grow onto the small stalk called a perdunculated fibroid. The third type of fibroid is subserosal which means the fibroid.

Develops on the outer wall of the womb. these can put pressure on the surrounding structures like the bladder and the bowel and intestines. When my patients come to see me with symptoms that suggest fibroids I may prescribe medication to help ease and manage those symptoms. These medications include hormonal treatment which may.

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